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  • New Costa perks up Midland hub

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  • Planning granted for affordable homes in Coventry

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  • Lease agreed on Leamington unit

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  • Ledbury residents invited to have say on new development scheme

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  • Blog: How construction is adapting to a limited return to site working

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  • Blog: The planning system during lock down….

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  • Investments see success

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  • Key figures mark Starbucks opening

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  • Older News 1 2 3 4 5 6

New Costa perks up Midland hub

A new Costa Coffee drive-thru restaurant is being created on a site in Wolverhampton – and will be central to perking up a well-loved community hub.

Midlands based developer Deeley Properties, in partnership with Ziran Land, has won planning consent to create the new drive-thru on the Birmingham New Road and Spring Road.

The development will be built on land owned by the 44 Club, which will be investing the sale proceeds back into the club and its facilities including its bar and function room, as well as snooker, crown green bowls, darts and a shooting range.

The club was founded in 1944, by some prominent Wolverhampton business leaders and now has around 240 members. The permission will also see money donated to local outdoor green spaces.

The development will create five full time and 12 part time jobs, and work is expected to begin on the new unit in September with opening in Spring 2021.

Andrew Brazier, of Deeley Properties, said: “This new unit will be a welcome addition to the local area and is situated on one of the main routes between Wolverhampton and Birmingham and will prove very popular both with people using the road network, but also locals.

“The land is not used at present but we have been able to realise considerable value for the 44 Club to help it improve what is a well-loved facility used by generations of people from the local community.

“We work across the retail sector throughout the UK, creating new units for a range of end-users. To have brought this forward from concept, through planning and delivery, for the benefit of all involved, is really pleasing.

Pictured: Andrew Brazier

Planning granted for affordable homes in Coventry

 

The site of a former school in Wyken, Coventry is set to be re-developed as affordable housing after planning permission was granted for 39 homes.

The site was formerly the home of Dartmouth School and was then a temporary home for The Seva School up until September 2015.

Since Seva School moved to its new home in Walsgrave, it has been a redundant brownfield site for almost five years.

Planning permission has now been granted for 23 affordable rented and 16 shared ownership properties to be built on Tiverton Road, by Coventry-based family firm Deeley Group for leading housing provider Stonewater.

The site was originally purchased from Coventry City Council and upon completion will feature 39 brand-new homes comprising a mix of two, three and four-bedroom houses.

Stonewater and Deeley Group previously worked together on the successful development of another affordable development at Feather Lane in Nuneaton, which completed earlier this year.

The Deeley Group has a proud history of projects in the area with founder George Deeley building nearby St John Fisher school in the 1950s – who was also joined by a young Peter Deeley, now managing director, who drove a dumper on the site.

Peter went on to help build St John Fisher Church in the 1970s, and current Deeley Construction managing director Martin Gallagher was on-site to build the parish hall in the 1990s.

Now Eleanor Deeley, as part of Deeley Affordable Living, has secured the planning for the delivery of this new housing for the community.

Peter Deeley, Managing Director of the Deeley Group, said: “There is a genuine need for more housing of this type in Coventry and we are pleased to be able to deliver this development alongside our partners.

“We have a strong relationship with Stonewater and we are looking forward to working closely with them again, after the great success of our project in Nuneaton.

“With planning now approved, work will be starting on site in the coming months.

“This scheme will provide vital affordable housing for the community in Wyken and surrounding areas and makes good use of what would otherwise be a redundant brownfield site.

“Deeley Group has a history of development in the area, building St John Fisher Catholic Primary school in the 1950s and St John Fisher church and hall in the 1970s. Many years ago I drove machinery on the nearby site as I began my career in construction.

“We have great expertise in delivering developments of this type for local people, and it is the latest in a string of affordable housing schemes we have worked on in Coventry, Warwickshire and further afield.”

Matt Crucefix, Director of Development (West) at Stonewater, said: “We’re delighted to be working with the Deeley Group on another regenerative project so that we can make better use of this brownfield site.

“Trying to manage the spread of Covid-19 over the last few months has shone a light on just how important it is that everyone has a place to call home and has really amplified the importance of our work as a social housing provider.

“We’re looking forward for work to get underway at Tiverton Road, so we can support the local community and bring more much-needed affordable homes to Wyken.”

Lease agreed on Leamington unit

Deeley Group has agreed the lease of a unit in Leamington to an engineering firm which is planning to become a world leader in the development and manufacture of PPE.

Tecman Advanced Material Engineers have leased the unit at Ramsey Road, Leamington, formerly the home of Bellagio Stone.

It will house its production facility dedicated to the manufacture of face and eye protection.

The new premises include 10,000 sq ft of storage, a new automation system to streamline production, and state-of-the-art machinery to boost manufacturing capacity.

The new production line will enable to firm to produce over a million protective visors per week, and support the company’s long-term vision of becoming a global industry leader.

The firm says the site has already created 30 new jobs at the company and will create a further 10 jobs in the future.

Peter Deeley, Managing Director of the Deeley Group, said: “Tecman has been doing incredible work during the Covid-19 pandemic to manufacture PPE and we’re pleased this new facility will allow the firm to further expand operation.

“The unit is ideally positioned on the outskirts of Leamington near a collection of businesses that form a thriving business community.

“The business will be providing vital new jobs to local people, which is even more important now as the area recovers from the impact of Covid-19.

“The deal was completed quickly and we look forward to working in partnership with Tecman more in the future.”

Kevin Porter, technical director at Tecman, added: “Developing and manufacturing an effective product to support frontline workers has already led to the creation of 30 new jobs at Tecman.

“Our expansion into new premises creates a need to expand our team further, and we’re delighted to be able to offer jobs within the West Midlands during a time when many are unable to work.”

Ledbury residents invited to have say on new development scheme

Ledbury residents are being encouraged to have their say on a new community-led development scheme before it is submitted for planning permission.

The scheme, known as Leadon Vale, is being developed by Midlands-based Deeley Group and the family-owned company is engaging with the local community through an online public consultation.

The new development will feature a community medical centre, locally-run children’s day nursery and a Lidl food store.

It is proposed to be built adjacent to the Old Wharf Industrial Estate, where Leadon Way meets Dymock Road.

There will be just under 200 car parking spaces at Leadon Vale, with the development offering a range of amenities and employment opportunities for existing and new residents in the south of Ledbury.

The energy-efficient buildings are designed to respond to the surrounding area with fitting design, including a green roof on the 23,412 sq ft Lidl store.

A public consultation was planned to take place in May however due to Covid-19 this will not be possible, so the event will be taking place online.

Eleanor Deeley, Deputy Managing Director of the Deeley Group, said: “The Deeley Group always make a priority of engaging with communities wherever we work to ensure we create a sustainable footprint on the local area.

“Leadon Vale is in a fantastic location to provide support to local people and is within walking and cycling distance of those who live on the south side of the town.

“We would like to hear feedback from residents on the proposed development and ensure it responds to the needs of the community before submitting for planning permission.”

Woodlands Nursery will be operating the day nursery and it will be the site of their third pre-school, with other sites at Hereford and Ross-on-Wye.

The nursery will offer at least 23 full and part-time jobs to qualified and apprenticeship staff, while also providing in-house training opportunities for local people who are interested in a career in early years.

Oliver Marshall, Director of Woodlands Nursery, added: “We are delighted to be able to take forward these plans for a new purpose-built nursery school at Leadon Vale.

“We have been searching for a site near Ledbury for a number of years, having been told by local people and businesses that they desperately need an early years facility like this in the town.

“Leadon Vale is a really well thought out proposal, and as a local business we are delighted to be involved. We believe it will be a credit to the area.”

To find out more about Leadon Vale and to provide feedback on the proposal visit www.deeley.co.uk/properties/our-developments/leadon-vale/

 

Blog: How construction is adapting to a limited return to site working

Eleanor Deeley, Deputy Managing Director of the Deeley Group, on how construction is adapting to a limited return to site working

There is no doubt that parts of the economy are beginning to show signs of life – but the tap is only being turned on very slowly.

I was on one of many recent video calls when someone said that as we end lockdown it will be a little like when you have had your boiler repaired. When you turn on tap it splutters as the pipes refill and takes a while for the flow to be resumed.

On the construction side of the Deeley Group, the announcement of lockdown and social distancing meant our tap was tightly turned off and we closed our 11 sites.

I fully appreciate that it is very difficult for Government to be clear and concise bearing in mind the myriad of unprecented measures they are bringing in at the moment but there was, at best, uncertainty as to what was essential working.

Also, the advice that work would continue also came with a heavy hint that there was little understanding as to how a site works and that did cause concern in the industry.

Slowly the sector got to grips with exactly how we could continue working to a level while strictly adhering to the social distancing rules. That has, inevitably, meant big changes in how we work.

For example, signing in is now by text rather than an electronic fingerprint system; canteens are closed; site times, break times and lunch times are staggered; we can only have 10-30 per cent of the number of people on site to allow for social distancing.

There have been struggles getting materials – especially plasterboard – and many of the builders’ merchants were closed until very recently. That is all easing and the supply of UK-produced goods is getting much better, but there will be times when we are held up by the absence of products such as lifts or air-conditioning units, which have to be imported.

Interestingly, in a world of sub-contractors, there has been a total regard for the health and wellbeing of staff, which has been refreshing to witness particularly when, at the same time, there were images from major construction projects where workers paying no attention to the guidance.

Sub-contractors are only coming back to sites where they are confident that social distancing can be maintained and, when it can’t, there is suitable PPE used by all.

But no-one should be under the impression that this means we are back to normal. Social distancing is likely to remain in place for many months to come and this means that the rate of construction is going to remain low because of the limited numbers on site.

As ever, industry is going to have to find a way to overcome the hurdle. We might need

to extend working hours as we have the longer evenings arriving, almost operating a two-shift system to maximise the number of working hours on site.

I think an increase in weekend working is almost inevitable, but that will not only allow us to maintain progress as much as possible but it will also allow sub-contractors to earn, which will very welcome after the last two months.

Equally inevitable will be increased costs because efficient sequencing of a build will not be possible given the restrictions in place and the equipment shortages.

There are also other more trivial, but still important, consequences. Spirit on a site is always important but with people working alone we simply cannot interact in the same way.

There is going to be part of our morale that is absent as we miss the joke that we don’t hear, and the catch up over a coffee during a break.

But that is a small price to pay.

Blog: The planning system during lock down….

Eleanor Deeley, Deputy Managing Director of the Deeley Group, casts her eye over how the planning system is adjusting to life in lockdown

At a time when people have been panic buying shopping for toilet rolls, cutting their own hair and congregating for karaoke parties during the lockdown, it is refreshing – and indeed rare – to highlight the planning structure as a model of good sense.

Despite the tragic events which have crippled countries across the globe and robbed families of loved ones, other aspects of life have to try to operate as normal or at least adapt to the unique circumstances in which we find ourselves.

I think everyone has been pleasantly surprised, for example, how quickly people have adjusted to working from home and meeting virtually.

It would have been all too easy for development and construction to grind to a total halt. While many of the aspects of the profession have been rendered impossible through restrictions, the Government flexing planning regulations has allowed a great deal of work to continue when otherwise it would have been forced to cease.

The change has allowed more planning matters to be agreed under delegated powers which means that there continues to be a flow of applications being processed.

As with all aspects of business during the lockdown period, precise preparation and clear communication are vital in ensuring officers have as full a picture as possible allowing them to be comfortable they are able to make the right decisions.

The changes to planning regulations have also given council’s certain freedoms to decide the best ways to operate within guidelines.

Planning meetings can, for example, be held remotely with members logging in over the internet or on the telephone. The location of a meeting can now be defined digitally such as a web address or video conference call rather than a physical place.

As long as committee members, officers and applicants can hear and be heard then a meeting can go ahead. Contributions from the members of the public if they are allowed to speak can be registered in advantage.

I wonder how many times committees would like to have had a “mute facility” at their disposal in real meetings!

Public consultations are, by their very nature, far harder to carry out during lockdown yet the Local Government Association Planning Advisory Service has urged local authorities to press on employing social media, interactive maps and online information, and utilising virtual groups through channels such as Facebook.

These are still early days relative to public consultations and there are more formal and structured elements to the process which may not be able to be conducted remotely, and there is talk of guidance being flexed to make that possible should this situation continue.

There are elements which have proved trickier to overcome. Some smaller councils do not have it within their constitution to make decisions without a physical meeting while traffic counts – a key factor in planning applications and consents – are impossible to measure when we are restricted to essential journeys only.

Again, if lockdown continues then the system will have to adapt and research has shown that more than three quarters of councillors are behind the process continuing virtually until the crisis is behind us.

What this dreadful time has shown is that, when the pressure is on and needs must, the planning system, which at times seems massively inflexible, can be shaped and moulded to mutual benefit.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if that spirit of understanding and mutual working continued long after this horrible period is over?

Investments see success

Deeley Properties’ investment portfolio continues to see great success.

Deeley Properties acquired a 20,000 sq. ft. industrial warehouse on an established estate in Dudley in 2016. The property was then let to ERIKS with two years remaining on its lease.

Deeley identified the opportunity to refurbish and re-let or sell the building, whilst receiving a return on cost of 8.5% until the end of the lease.

Earlier this year the property on Crackley Way was sold to Pipework Engineering Services securing a significant return for the company.

The investment at Harwell Science & Technology Campus in Oxfordshire continues to show a good return. Nuva is the current tenant at the property and Andrew Brazier, development consultant, secured an increase of over 30% in rent.

Andrew said: “The property at Harwell remains part of our core portfolio as an investment in a growing science park and we hope that following this increase we shall be negotiating a new longer lease in exchange for some improvement works to the property.”

Key figures mark Starbucks opening

The main figures behind a new Starbucks drive-thru in Birmingham have come together to celebrate its completion.

Deeley Properties, in partnership with Ziran Land, acquired the site adjoining the Maypole Roundabout earlier this year from a private landowner to create the new café/restaurant, which has a 15-year lease.

The investment on the property, built by Deeley Construction, was sold to Custodian REIT through David Allen, of Holt Commercial, on completion.

Pat Moroney, of Deeley Group, John Liggins, of Ziran Land, and David Allen, of Holt Commercial, were key figures in the deal that saw Starbucks open in September, creating 18 jobs.

Pat said: “We saw this opportunity to work in partnership with Ziran Land to create this new Starbucks. It has worked extremely well for all parties and because of that relationship we are already looking at other very similar developments.

“It is a project where we saw potential to create value and also a new café/restaurant for the local community and perfectly fits Deeley Group’s ‘end to end’ capabilities in the delivery of projects.”

John said: “It has been an excellent project all round and it is great to have achieved completion and hand over the final property.

“It is great to have worked in partnership in this way and to have seen such a positive result.”

David said: “There is strong growth in this sector and I envisage many more developments of this type both across the region and nationally.”

Wade Commercial acted for Custodian REIT.

Pictured (left to right): John Liggins, Pat Moroney, David Allen

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